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HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THEREAPY OF PSEUDOMONAS DERMATITIS IN THE DOG: A CASE STUDY.

Nata_a Tozon2, Darroch G. Campbell1 & Jason A. Exner1. 1Baromedical Laboratory; Institute of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine & 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ljubijana, Slovenia

INTRODUCTION:

A two year old Dalmatian presented with a non-healting wound due to Pseudomonas dermatitis on the metatarsal region of the left hind limb. Conventional therapy, comprising antibiotics, corticosteroids and local chemotherapeutics, was administered at regular intervals over an 8 month period. Treatment with norfioxacin (10 mg/kg bw) was initiated subsequent to an antiobiogram. Due to no apparent improvement in the status of the wound and Pseudomonas dermatitis, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was intiaited as an adjunct to conventional therapy.

METHODS:

HBOT comprised 5 treatments per week over a 4 week period. During each treatment the patient was compressed with air to 2.5 ATA in a multiplace chamber for 60 minutes, and inspired pure oxygen via an oro-nasal mask. The wound site was photographed at weekly intervals, for the purpose of determining wound surface area. In addition, a bacteriological examination was conducted of the wound before and after the HBO therapy.

RESULTS:

Healing was intiaited after 5 treatments, and a substantial reduction of wound surface area was evidenced as a consequence of HBOT.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is concluded that HBOT should be considered as a therapy in Veterinary Medicine, and certainly as an adjunct to conventional therapy in the treatment of non-healing wounds with Pseudomonas dermatitis. This work was supported by a grant from the Ministry of Science and Technology (Slovenia) awarded to Prof. Igor B. Mekjavi .

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